Tomahawk Cruise Missile | Raytheon

Tomahawk vehicle data provided by Wikipedia

The Tomahawk is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. The missile was named after the Native American axe. Introduced by General Dynamics in the 1970s, it was initially designed as a medium to long-range, low-altitude missile that could be launched from a surface platform. It has been improved several times and, due to corporate divestitures and acquisitions, is now made by Raytheon. Some Tomahawks were also manufactured by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing Defense, Space & Security).

The Tomahawk missile family consists of a number of subsonic, jet engine-powered missiles designed to attack a variety of surface targets. Although a number of launch platforms have been deployed or envisaged, only sea (both surface ship and submarine) launched variants are currently in service. Tomahawk has a modular design, allowing a wide variety of warhead, guidance, and range capabilities.

F107 / WR19 Engine

The Williams F107 (company designation WR19) is a small turbofan engine made by Williams International. The F107 was designed to power cruise missiles. It has been used as the powerplant for the AGM-86 ALCM, and BGM-109 Tomahawk, as well as the experimental Williams X-Jet flying platform.

Diameter 20.4 in (0.52 m)

Wingspan 8 ft 9 in (2.67 m)

Length Without booster: 18 ft 3 in (5.56 m)

With booster: 20 ft 6 in (6.25 m)